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"God Heals Broken Hearts"... Really?

 
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exene
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Posted:     Post subject: "God Heals Broken Hearts"... Really?

What do you people think - has God (or something similar) healed your broken heart? Feel like jumping up and down for joy when the preacher comes to visit your town? Feel like confessing all of your transgressions to a complete stranger who wears a frilly frock and claims he is 'a messenger of the Lord'? When you look around do you see a lot of 'healed' people?
Let me tell you something: the closest thing I have found to a 'healing force' in my life has been my German band's music. Who would have thought that I could 'see a god' in them??
But I can.
And THEY help ease my pain - not some phony-baloney, pie-in-the-sky theory of a floating entity called God.
You?

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tomcat24m




tomcat24m

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February 23, 2012
Posts: 12

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`I would say *ss kicking games such as God of War, Call of Duty, or something else I can go leave a pile of virtual bodies as a symbol of releasing my anger... They heal my wounded heart.

Passive aggressive much? :P

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philosophica
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Posted:     Post subject:

What you say, Exen, reminded me of the meeting between Meursault, who was sentenced to death, and awaiting the execution, and the chaplain who came to visit him, at the end of Camus's "The Stranger". I know it is very long, but it is the best part of the novel, and I like to remind you of it:


Quote:
My thoughts had reached this point when the chaplain walked in, unannounced. I couldn’t help giving a start on seeing him. He noticed this evidently, as he promptly told me not to be alarmed. I reminded him that usually his visits were at another hour, and for a pretty grim occasion. This, he replied, was just a friendly visit; it had no concern with my appeal, about which he knew nothing. Then he sat down on my bed, asking me to sit beside him. I refused—not because I had anything against him; he seemed a mild, amiable man.

He remained quite still at first, his arms resting on his knees, his eyes fixed on his hands. They were slender but sinewy hands, which made me think of two nimble little animals. Then he gently rubbed them together. He stayed so long in the same position that for a while I almost forgot he was there.

All of a sudden he jerked his head up and looked me in the eyes.

“Why,†he asked, “don’t you let me come to see you?â€Â

I explained that I didn’t believe in God.

“Are you really so sure of that?â€Â

I said I saw no point in troubling my head about the matter; whether I believed or didn’t was, to my mind, a question of so little importance.

He then leaned back against the wall, laying his hands flat on his thighs. Almost without seeming to address me, he remarked that he’d often noticed one fancies one is quite sure about something, when in point of fact one isn’t. When I said nothing, he looked at me again, and asked:

“Don’t you agree?â€Â

I said that seemed quite possible. But, though I mightn’t be so sure about what interested me, I was absolutely sure about what didn’t interest me. And the question he had raised didn’t interest me at all.

He looked away and, without altering his posture, asked if it was because I felt utterly desperate that I spoke like this. I explained that it wasn’t despair I felt, but fear—which was natural enough.

“In that case,†he said firmly, “God can help you. All the men I’ve seen in your position turned to Him in their time of trouble.â€Â

Obviously, I replied, they were at liberty to do so, if they felt like it. I, however, didn’t want to be helped, and I hadn’t time to work up interest for something that didn’t interest me.

He fluttered his hands fretfully; then, sitting up, smoothed out his cassock. When this was done he began talking again, addressing me as “my friend.†It wasn’t because I’d been condemned to death, he said, that he spoke to me in this way. In his opinion every man on the earth was under sentence of death.

There, I interrupted him; that wasn’t the same thing, I pointed out, and, what’s more, could be no consolation.

He nodded. “Maybe. Still, if you don’t die soon, you’ll die one day. And then the same question will arise. How will you face that terrible, final hour?â€Â

I replied that I’d face it exactly as I was facing it now.

Thereat he stood up, and looked me straight in the eyes. It was a trick I knew well. I used to amuse myself trying it on Emmanuel and Céleste, and nine times out of ten they’d look away uncomfortably. I could see the chaplain was an old hand at it, as his gaze never faltered. And his voice was quite steady when he said: “Have you no hope at all? Do you really think that when you die you die outright, and nothing remains?â€Â

I said: “Yes.â€Â

He dropped his eyes and sat down again. He was truly sorry for me, he said. It must make life unbearable for a man, to think as I did.

The priest was beginning to bore me, and, resting a shoulder on the wall, just beneath the little skylight, I looked away. Though I didn’t trouble much to follow what he said, I gathered he was questioning me again. Presently his tone became agitated, urgent, and, as I realized that he was genuinely distressed, I began to pay more attention.

He said he felt convinced my appeal would succeed, but I was saddled with a load of guilt, of which I must get rid. In his view man’s justice was a vain thing; only God’s justice mattered. I pointed out that the former had condemned me. Yes, he agreed, but it hadn’t absolved me from my sin. I told him that I wasn’t conscious of any “sinâ€Â; all I knew was that I’d been guilty of a criminal offense. Well, I was paying the penalty of that offense, and no one had the right to expect anything more of me.

Just then he got up again, and it struck me that if he wanted to move in this tiny cell, almost the only choice lay between standing up and sitting down. I was staring at the floor. He took a single step toward me, and halted, as if he didn’t dare to come nearer. Then he looked up through the bars at the sky.

“You’re mistaken, my son,†he said gravely. “There’s more that might be required of you. And perhaps it will be required of you.â€Â

“What do you mean?â€Â
“You might be asked to see ...â€Â
“To see what?â€Â

Slowly the priest gazed round my cell, and I was struck by the sadness of his voice when he replied:

“These stone walls, I know it only too well, are steeped in human suffering. I’ve never been able to look at them without a shudder. And yet—believe me, I am speaking from the depths of my heart—I know that even the wretchedest amongst you have sometimes seen, taking form against that grayness, a divine face. It’s that face you are asked to see.â€Â

This roused me a little. I informed him that I’d been staring at those walls for months; there was nobody, nothing in the world, I knew better than I knew them. And once upon a time, perhaps, I used to try to see a face. But it was a sun-gold face, lit up with desire—Marie’s face. I had no luck; I’d never seen it, and now I’d given up trying. Indeed, I’d never seen anything “taking form,†as he called it, against those gray walls.

The chaplain gazed at me with a sort of sadness. I now had my back to the wall and light was flowing over my forehead. He muttered some words I didn’t catch; then abruptly asked if he might kiss me. I said, “No.†Then he turned, came up to the wall, and slowly drew his hand along it.

“Do you really love these earthly things so very much?†he asked in a low voice.

I made no reply.

For quite a while he kept his eyes averted. His presence was getting more and more irksome, and I was on the point of telling him to go, and leave me in peace, when all of a sudden he swung round on me, and burst out passionately:

“No! No! I refuse to believe it. I’m sure you’ve often wished there was an afterlife.â€Â

Of course I had, I told him. Everybody has that wish at times. But that had no more importance than wishing to be rich, or to swim very fast, or to have a better-shaped mouth. It was in the same order of things. I was going on in the same vein, when he cut in with a question. How did I picture the life after the grave?

I fairly bawled out at him: “A life in which I can remember this life on earth. That’s all I want of it.†And in the same breath I told him I’d had enough of his company.

But, apparently, he had more to say on the subject of God. I went close up to him and made a last attempt to explain that I’d very little time left, and I wasn’t going to waste it on God.

Then he tried to change the subject by asking me why I hadn’t once addressed him as “Father,†seeing that he was a priest. That irritated me still more, and I told him he wasn’t my father; quite the contrary, he was on the others’ side.

“No, no, my son,†he said, laying his hand on my shoulder. “I’m on your side, though you don’t realize it—because your heart is hardened. But I shall pray for you.â€Â

Then, I don’t know how it was, but something seemed to break inside me, and I started yelling at the top of my voice. I hurled insults at him, I told him not to waste his rotten prayers on me; it was better to burn than to disappear. I’d taken him by the neckband of his cassock, and, in a sort of ecstasy of joy and rage, I poured out on him all the thoughts that had been simmering in my brain. He seemed so c----ure, you see. And yet none of his certainties was worth one strand of a woman’s hair. Living as he did, like a corpse, he couldn’t even be sure of being alive. It might look as if my hands were empty. Actually, I was sure of myself, sure about everything, far surer than he; sure of my present life and of the death that was coming. That, no doubt, was all I had; but at least that certainty was something I could get my teeth into—just as it had got its teeth into me. I’d been right, I was still right, I was always right. I’d passed my life in a certain way, and I might have passed it in a different way, if I’d felt like it. I’d acted thus, and I hadn’t acted otherwise; I hadn’t done x, whereas I had done y or z. And what did that mean? That, all the time, I’d been waiting for this present moment, for that dawn, tomorrow’s or another day’s, which was to justify me. Nothing, nothing had the least importance and I knew quite well why. He, too, knew why. From the dark horizon of my future a sort of slow, persistent breeze had been blowing toward me, all my life long, from the years that were to come. And on its way that breeze had leveled out all the ideas that people tried to foist on me in the equally unreal years I then was living through. What difference could they make to me, the deaths of others, or a mother’s love, or his God; or the way a man decides to live, the fate he thinks he chooses, since one and the same fate was bound to “choose†not only me but thousands of millions of privileged people who, like him, called themselves my brothers. Surely, surely he must see that? Every man alive was privileged; there was only one class of men, the privileged class. All alike would be condemned to die one day; his turn, too, would come like the others’. And what difference could it make if, after being charged with murder, he were executed because he didn’t weep at his mother’s funeral, since it all came to the same thing in the end? The same thing for Salamano’s wife and for Salamano’s dog. That little robot woman was as “guilty†as the girl from Paris who had married Masson, or as Marie, who wanted me to marry her. What did it matter if Raymond was as much my pal as Céleste, who was a far worthier man? What did it matter if at this very moment Marie was kissing a new boy friend? As a condemned man himself, couldn’t he grasp what I meant by that dark wind blowing from my future? ...


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"See, this is why I can't get behind God. If He doesn't exist, fine. Bad crap happens to good people. That's how it is. No rhyme or reason, just random horrible, evil. I get it. Okay? I can roll with that. But if He is out there, what's wrong with Him? Where the hell is He while all these decent people are getting torn to shreds? How does He live with Himself? You know, why doesn't He help?"
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nomagiccookie




nomagiccookie

Joined:
June 27, 2012
Posts: 2

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As a rational individual I have always been free of the useless distraction of a god concept. However, based on what I have read, introducing a god into any equation only needlessly complicates or at best replaces one mental hardship with an equally destructive fantasy that often shackles a person's ability to exercise reason, leaving the individual open to additional deception. What possible good can one hope to accomplish by subscribing to any fantasy; to abandon reality? I would subject this action is as destructive as turning to mind altering drugs. Both offer an unnecessary distraction to dealing with the pitfalls and highlights of our precious and very finite life.



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a1oenesome




a1oenesome

Joined:
October 27, 2011
Posts: 46

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`I think you might find this interesting if you have not already seen it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp4WUFXvCFQ

"Faith: Pretending to know things you don't know" by Dr. Peter Boghossian

In the film he suggests replacing the word "faith" with the statement: "Pretending to know things you don't know".

So next time you read an obituary and it reads "He was a man of faith" you could read it as "He was a man who pretended to know things he didn't know".

The other subject is "faith" and "hope" and how they are often wrongly linked.


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trekker1701




trekker1701

Joined:
August 12, 2012
Posts: 5

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`God only heals broken hearts if you're a faith-head and part of the believer culture. If you're not so lucky, you'd might as well crawl away somewhere and die because you'll be treated with all the compassion a leper receives. I know, I've been there.

Christians actually Want me to die. One less evil loner to worry about!


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a1oenesome




a1oenesome

Joined:
October 27, 2011
Posts: 46

PostPosted:     Post subject:
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trekker1701 wrote:
`God only heals broken hearts if you're a faith-head and part of the believer culture.


Didn't George Michael once sing "You've got to have faith"? And look what happened to him!

trekker1701 wrote:
If you're not so lucky, you'd might as well crawl away somewhere and die because you'll be treated with all the compassion a leper receives. I know, I've been there.


So even though you don't suffer from the religion disease and knowing what you know, you are not a very happy little atheist in spite of these advantages.

trekker1701 wrote:
Christians actually Want me to die. One less evil loner to worry about!


Well they want everyone to die, it's a common thread with these religions. They are death cults where the "soul" is redeemed in their afterlife. Death is the ultimate goal for them.

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trekker1701




trekker1701

Joined:
August 12, 2012
Posts: 5

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`Death cults, yeah. Came across enough of that in SF novels... Peter David and Alan Dean Foster I think...

Maybe I should join them...


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